Alabama Senate approves nation’s strictest abortion ban

Alabama Senate approves nation’s strictest abortion ban

The Alabama bill includes exceptions for pregnancies that pose a health risk to the mother, but not for rape and incest. | Getty Images health care Alabama Senate approves nation’s strictest abortion ban By DAN GOLDBERG 05/14/2019 10:11 PM EDT Updated 05/15/2019 12:39 AM EDT Wed May 15 00:39:07 EDT 2019 Share on Facebook Share on Twitter The Alabama Senate on Tuesday approved the nation’s toughest anti-abortion ban, hoping the legislation will spark a legal challenge leading to the demise of Roe v. Wade. The legislation is even stricter than the wave of so-called heartbeat bills that have recently been passed by Republicans in Georgia and other conservative states, who believe the Supreme Court’s new conservative majority is poised to chip away at, or perhaps obliterate, abortion rights. The Alabama bill would outlaw virtually all abortions in the state, and doctors could face up to 99 years in prison — basically a life sentence — for performing an abortion.Story Continued Below “The Supreme Court is not a body that makes a ruling forever,” said state Republican Sen. Clyde Chambliss, who acknowledged the purpose of the legislation is to overturn longstanding precedent. The state Senate approved the bill, 25-6, with one abstention, after nearly five hours of debate, during which Democrats did most of the talking. Just days earlier, the state Senate had scrapped a vote amid a heated floor debate over GOP efforts to strip from the bill exceptions for pregnancies resulting from rape or incest. Democrat Bobby Singleton proposed an amendment Tuesday that would have reinserted those protections. Singleton brought three rape victims to the chamber, and pointed out that under the proposed law, the doctor who performs an abortion can spend more time in prison than the rapist. Morning eHealth A daily report on the intersection of health care and technology — in your inbox. Email Sign Up By signing up you agree to receive email newsletters or alerts from POLITICO. You can unsubscribe at any time. “Something is wrong with that,“ he said. But his amendment failed 21-11. Four Republicans joined the chamber’s seven Democrats. Several other Democrat-sponsored amendments failed, meaning the bill does not need to go back to the House, which passed an identical version of the legislation last month. Republican Gov. Kay Ivey, who has declined comment on the legislation, is expected to sign it. Abortion rights groups said they will immediately mount a legal challenge to the measure, contending it violates the landmark 1973 Roe ruling guaranteeing a woman’s right to an abortion until a fetus is viable. “Politicians in Alab
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